Eid-ul-Fitr Traditions Across the World





As we find ourselves at the end of Ramadan, now is the perfect time to look ahead and consider what the future will bring. Regardless of our faith, equality and generosity are things we should aim to include in our daily lives. Of course, every faith has its own traditions, events and special occasions – for those who frequently travel the world, it is important to ensure that you are fully clued up and aware of the cultural traditions in the countries you will be visiting. 

In Islam, the Holy month of Ramadan is one of the most important times of the year. It is a time for fasting, prayer and reflection, and is observed in many predominantly-Muslim countries. However, once the month of Ramadan comes to an end, it is time for Eid-ul-Fitr.
Eid-ul-Fitr is another important occasion in the Islamic calendar. It is a festival of celebration, commemorating the end of Ramadan and the breaking of the fast, and is a time where Muslims across the world join together to celebrate.

Although there are certain traditions that are common throughout the world on Eid-ul-Fitr, there are many others which can vary by country and region.

For those who are planning to travel or visit these places during Eid-ul-Fitr, it is important to ensure that you are aware of the customs and traditions of the particular area you will be visiting. Not only is this an important way to be respectful and considerate of the local’s faith and beliefs, but it is also essential to guarantee that you don’t fall foul of any localised laws or customs.

To get started, here are some common traditions which take place on Eid-ul-Fitr.
On the morning of the first day that Eid is celebrated, Muslims will bathe and dress in their best clothes before visiting their local Mosque for congregational prayers. Following the prayers, the traditional greeting of “Eid Mubarak” (have a Blessed Eid) will be used to greet friends, family members and other Muslims.

Many Muslims will then spend the day visiting loved ones, eating traditional dishes and sweets and spending time together. In addition, children are commonly given gifts at Eid.
When it comes to traditions by country, there are understandably certain variations and differences in the way that Eid is celebrated. By no means is this an exhaustive list, but here are a few traditions from around the world.

Indonesia
Indonesia is home to 12.7% of the world’s Muslim population – the largest Muslim population in a single country. Therefore, it should come as no surprise to learn that Eid-ul-Fitr is a significant occasion in Indonesia! During the festival, locals participate in parades, watch fireworks and go shopping for gifts for their loved ones. When it comes to food, traditional dishes like Rendang (a spicy meat dish) and Brongkos (a traditional soup dish) are usually enjoyed.

Tunisia
Eid-ul-Fitr is a real celebration in Tunisia, with many people spending the occasion enjoying time with their families. The youngest members of the family will be given money or small gifts like toys, and traditional Eid cuisine like biscuits, Kaak (a type of cake) and Baklawa (a sweet pastry dessert with chopped nuts and honey) will be eaten.

Morocco
Traditional Eid breakfast foods in Morocco include delicious treats such as cookies, Baghrir and Melwi (types of Moroccan pancake), washed down with refreshing mint tea.

India
Although Islam is not India’s main faith, Muslims throughout the country celebrate it in a number of different ways. Women wear traditional clothing and decorate their hands with henna designs, and the night before Eid, many Indian Muslims go out shopping. In this country, a traditional sweet Eid dish is Sheer Khurma – a milk pudding with dates.
As the month of Ramadan draws to an end, make sure that you are fully clued up about Eid-ul-Fitr and everything that this special occasion means to Muslims around the world.

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